Sean O'Brien

EDUCATE Athletes

You Wanna Go?
Go Stache to Stache with me  in a Live Google+ Hangout.
MOnday, December 17 at 7:30 PM ETBroadcast Live @ educateathletes.com
First, we’ll talk NHL Enforcers, the Lockout, Education, and most importantly, MOVEMBER and Moustaches.
If you think you have what it takes, register now to pursue the greatest MOment in your competitive life.  My 3 Challengers will be selected from the pictures on MOVEMBER 30.
  http://educateathletes.com/georgeparros
Also, win a chance to hangout with me after the show!

You Wanna Go?

Go Stache to Stache with me  in a Live Google+ Hangout.

MOnday, December 17 at 7:30 PM ET
Broadcast Live @ educateathletes.com

First, we’ll talk NHL Enforcers, the Lockout, Education, and most importantly, MOVEMBER and Moustaches.

If you think you have what it takes, register now to pursue the greatest MOment in your competitive life.  My 3 Challengers will be selected from the pictures on MOVEMBER 30.

  http://educateathletes.com/georgeparros

Also, win a chance to hangout with me after the show!

By LAURA PAPPANO
Published: November 2, 2012
IN late September, as workers applied joint compound to new office walls, hoodie-clad colleagues who had just met were working together on deadline. Film editors, code-writing interns and “edX fellows” — grad students and postdocs versed in online education — were translating videotaped lectures into MOOCs, or massive open online courses. As if anyone needed reminding, a row of aqua Post-its gave the dates the courses would “go live.”  
The paint is barely dry, yet edX, the nonprofit start-up from Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has 370,000 students this fall in its first official courses. That’s nothing. Coursera, founded just last January, has reached more than 1.7 million — growing “faster than Facebook,” boasts Andrew Ng, on leave from Stanford to run his for-profit MOOC provider.

IN late September, as workers applied joint compound to new office walls, hoodie-clad colleagues who had just met were working together on deadline. Film editors, code-writing interns and “edX fellows” — grad students and postdocs versed in online education — were translating videotaped lectures into MOOCs, or massive open online courses. As if anyone needed reminding, a row of aqua Post-its gave the dates the courses would “go live.”  

The paint is barely dry, yet edX, the nonprofit start-up from Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has 370,000 students this fall in its first official courses. That’s nothing. Coursera, founded just last January, has reached more than 1.7 million — growing “faster than Facebook,” boasts Andrew Ng, on leave from Stanford to run his for-profit MOOC provider.